Baingan Bharta

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Baingan bharta is THE eggplant dish that will make you fall in love with eggplant! It's a smoky eggplant mash mixed with a flavorful blend of garlic, ginger, spices, and tomatoes. Choose from the traditional method for the best results—smoking whole eggplants on an open flame—or the sauté method for something a little easier.
Prep 10 minutes
Cook 30 minutes
Total 40 minutes
5 from 116 votes

Whenever I ask y’all which Indian recipes you’d like to see, Baingan Bharta is always high on the list. So I’m excited to finally share my version. It’s silky and jammy in texture, boasts a tantalizing smoky aroma, and is brimming with warm, pungent Indian spices.

It requires relatively few ingredient and is naturally vegan, gluten-free, nut-free, and soy-free, so it’s allergen-friendly. Serve it as a main course with some homemade vegan naan and gobi manchurian or serve it as as a side dish with some dal tadka or vegan palak paneer!

PS: If you or your family members are eggplant skeptics, rest assured this is the one eggplant dish that even eggplant haters will enjoy. My partner Max has a blanket “I hate eggplant” policy, but I was able to sneak this one on him because it doesn’t look like eggplant. And he not only enjoyed it, but asked for seconds.

Table of Contents
1. What is Baingan Bharta?
2. Why this recipe works
3. Ingredient notes
4. Step-by-step instructions
5. Expert tips
6. Frequently Asked Questions
7. What to serve with this recipe
8. Recipe Card

baingan bharta in a navy blue dish with cilantro naan tucked in on a light pink table.

What is Baingan Bharta?

Baingan Bharta is an eggplant dish originating in the Punjab region of India, though there are many regional variations (as with almost every dish in a country as diverse as India). It’s smoky, spicy, and tangy, and so flavorful!

In Hindi, baingan means eggplant and bharta means mash or filling (sometimes, the dish is also called baingan ka bharta, or mash of eggplant).

First, for the baingan: You roast a whole eggplant over an open flame until the skin blackens and chars, which infuses the entire eggplant with a smoky aroma and taste. In Punjab, the eggplant is often roasted in the tandoor oven, which infuses it with that smoky charcoal aroma.

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For the bharta: You’ll sauté aromatics like onions, ginger, garlic, and green chiles in a bit of oil, along with a few spices like coriander and red chile powder; then you’ll add some tomatoes for that tangy flavor and cook until soft. Finally, add the eggplant mash into the bharta and cook everything together to blend the flavors.

Fun fact: eggplant, AKA aubergine, originated in India and is believed to have been around for thousands of years!

baingan bharta in a shallow dark bowl with naan in the background.

Why this recipe works

At its core, this is is a pretty simple dish featuring minimal ingredients.

The one “secret” to the most flavorful baingan bharta is to smoke the whole eggplant over an open flame until charred and almost falling apart. This infuses every bite of eggplant with the smoky aroma and taste that is a hallmark of this dish.

I tested five different methods for cooking the eggplant: (1) char a whole eggplant over an open flame; (2) roast a whole eggplant in the oven; (3) grill whole eggplant on a grill pan; (4) roast chopped eggplant in the oven; and (5) sauté chopped eggplant in a frying pan.

Methods 2, 3, and 4 were no-gos. (2) Oven-roasting the whole eggplant = watery eggplant with zero flavor. (3) Grilling whole eggplant in a grill pan = a little more flavor but not any smokiness. (4) Roasting chopped eggplant = more flavorful but the eggplant dried out a bit and didn’t mash well, plus no smokiness.

The best method, no surprise, is the “authentic” method: smoking a whole eggplant over an open flame (on your gas stove). It adds that bold smoky aroma and makes the eggplant flesh silky and unctuous.

However, for those who don’t have a gas stove or don’t feel comfortable with this technique, method 5—sautéing chopped eggplant in oil and salt in a frying pan—also worked quite well, producing soft, jammy eggplant that was easy to mash and had nice eggplant flavor.

Of course, sautéing eggplant doesn’t give you that classic smoky flavor, but as you’ll see below, you can infuse smoky flavor into it with another quick method.

Ingredient notes

This recipe uses several ingredients common in Indian cooking: onions, garlic, ginger, green chiles, tomatoes, turmeric, coriander, Indian red chile powder, garam masala, and cilantro.

prepped ingredients for baingan bharta on brown surface, with ingredients labeled.

The most important ingredient and the star of baingan bharta is eggplant. If you are smoking it over an open flame, here are a few tips when buying an eggplant.

  • Standard globe eggplant, Italian eggplant, or Indian eggplant (skinny Japanese and Chinese varieties will collapse on the stove).
  • Medium-sized (around 14 to 16 ounces)
  • Relatively uniform in girth from top to bottom. If your eggplant is very skinny on top but very fat on bottom, the top will cook through much faster and collapse before the bottom can cook).
  • Relatively ripe/soft. The softer the eggplant, the faster it will cook on the stove (about 15 minutes). If your eggplant is on the firm side, it’ll still turn out great, but it will take closer to 30 minutes to cook.

Step-by-step instructions

Cook the eggplant.

The below photos/instructions are for roasting the eggplant directly over a stove flame (the traditional method of making baingan bharta). If you’re not comfortable with this method or don’t have a gas stove, use the sauté method, which is outlined in the recipe card notes below.

Brush the eggplant with a light coating of oil and peel off/trim as much of the stem on top as you can (to avoid burning). Heat a gas burner over medium-low heat.

Use tongs to hold the eggplant upright over the flame; char the bottom of the eggplant for 4-6 minutes.

Flip the eggplant upside down and char the top for about 3 minutes. If the stem starts to burn, take it off the heat and try to trim more of it off.

Flip the eggplant on its side and position the thicker bottom half directly over the flame. Cook, rotating every 2 minutes, for 15 to 20 minutes, or until a knife can easily pierce the fattest part with no resistance.

Move the thinner top half of the eggplant directly over the flame. Cook, rotating every 2 minutes, for a total of 6 minutes.

The eggplant should be deeply charred all over, wrinkly, and almost falling apart, like the photo on the right.

Use tongs to transfer the eggplant to a bowl, and cover with a plate to steam for 5 minutes (this is essential for making the eggplant easier to peel).

Use your hands to peel off the skin (you may want to dip your hands in a bit of water to make it easier to peel). Remove the big ashy black bits (tiny bits are fine).

Slice off the head of the eggplant and mash the flesh of the eggplant until very soft (use a knife or potato masher).

Make the bharta (filling).

The instructions for making the bharta (the filling or the mash) are the same whether you roast the eggplant over the stove flame or cook it on the skillet.

Heat the oil in a frying pan over medium-high heat. Fry the cumin seeds for a minute. Add the onions with a pinch of salt and cook for 4 to 5 minutes.

Cook until onions are softened but not browned. Add the garlic, ginger, serrano peppers, and turmeric, and cook for 60 to 90 seconds. 

Once very aromatic, add the tomatoes, salt, and coriander.

Cook until the tomatoes are soft, well incorporated, and start to release oil, about 5 minutes. 

Add in the mashed eggplant mixture and kashmiri chili powder and toss well to combine.

Reduce the heat and cook for 3 to 5 minutes, stirring the eggplant into the bharta and mashing together. Add in the garam masala and chopped cilantro and season with salt.

Expert tips for this recipe

The eggplant needs to be very soft.

When smoking the eggplant over an open flame, wait until the eggplant is very soft. You might think it’s done because the skin is charred, but you need to test the fattest part of the eggplant with a paring knife. If there’s some resistance, it’s not ready. If there’s no resistance, like in the video below, it’s good to go.

Worried that the eggplant is charring too much on the outside but not cooking on the inside? Just lower the heat a touch.

How to test eggplant for doneness
How to test eggplant for doneness

Your stove will get messy.

There’s no real way to avoid your stove getting messy when you smoke the eggplant directly over the flame. Some folks say you can line your stove with foil, but I think that’s a fire hazard. Instead, just use a grease-cutting soap and a tough sponge to clean up your stove later. A cleaning solution like Bar Keepers Friend, a baking soda paste, and/or a 1:1 mixture of distilled white vinegar and water will go a long way.

If you don’t want to deal with that, use the stovetop method to cook the eggplant. It’s not the “authentic” way but it’s still delicious, especially if you can add some smokiness through the Dunghar Method (more on that in the first FAQ below).

Don’t forget to briefly steam the charred eggplant.

Once the smoked eggplant is done, transfer it to a bowl and cover it with a plate to steam for 5 minutes. The steam will make it much easier to peel off the skin. It still requires a few minutes and some patience, but it’ll be much harder if you don’t steam it.

Both versions are very delicious.

If you don’t have a gas stove or are nervous about cooking the eggplant on an open flame, don’t worry. The stovetop eggplant version is still very good. You won’t get the same smoky flavor, but it’s still a great dish. Plus, you can add some of that smoky flavor in using another method that takes just a couple minutes (read the first FAQ for more info!).

baingan bharta in a navy shallow bowl with naan

Frequently Asked Questions

How do I sauté the eggplant instead of smoking it?

1. Peel the eggplant. Slice in half lengthwise, then cut each half lengthwise again into 4 wedges and then cut each wedge again into 8 pieces. Finally, cut the wedges into ½-inch pieces. 

2. Heat 2 1/2 tablespoons of neutral-flavored oil in a large nonstick frying pan over medium-high heat. Once the oil is hot and shimmering, add the eggplant and season with ½ teaspoon kosher salt. Cook, tossing occasionally, for about 6 minutes, until the eggplant starts to break down. Reduce the heat to medium and continue cooking until the eggplant is soft and jam-like and there’s no resistance when pierced with a fork, about 20 minutes. 

3. Mash the eggplant as described in the instructions above.

If I sauté the eggplant, how can I get the traditional smoky flavor of baingan bharta?

You can use the traditional Indian method of coal-smoking food called the Dhungar Method. It does not produce the exact same smoky flavor as charring the eggplant over an open flame, but it does add a nice smokiness that is not overpowering.

All you need is a piece of lump charcoal, a small bowl, and a tiny bit of oil (you can get charcoal at any hardware store and many grocery stores).

When the dish is done, light a 1 to 2-inch piece of lump charcoal over a gas flame until smoking and red hot. Place a small stainless steel or glass bowl in the middle of the dish. Add the hot charcoal to the bowl, pour ½ teaspoon oil on the charcoal, and cover with a lid as soon as it starts smoking. Cover for 2 to 3 minutes to infuse the smoke.

Tip: If you want to see a video of how I use the Dhungar method in another recipe, check out my Dal Makhani video on YouTube at the 5:34 mark.

Can I grill the eggplant instead to achieve the smoky flavor?

As I mentioned earlier, I grilled whole eggplant on an indoor grill pan, but it didn’t yield any smoky flavor. But, if you have an outdoor charcoal grill, it would be a good option, though it can be time consuming.

To grill eggplant, grease your grill grates well and and preheat the grill over medium-high. Once the grill is smoking, add the whole eggplant. Turn occasionally, until the skins are completely charred and the insides are soft (it took 40 to 50 minutes on a grill pan). 

Can I use liquid smoke to achieve the smoky flavor?

No! Liquid smoke is best-suited for American-style dishes like BBQ or vegan “bacon” and does not vibe well with Indian flavors.

Can I make this dish ahead of time? Can you freeze baingan bharta?

Yes! You can prepare the eggplant 5 days in advance; just store it in an airtight container in the fridge. You can also make the bharta several days in advance and store it separately.

Leftover baingan bharta will stay good in the fridge for 5 to 6 days; you can also freeze it for a few months with good results.

To reheat, microwave or add to a frying pan on medium-low heat until warmed through.

baingan bharta in a navy blue dish with cilantro naan tucked in on a light pink table.

What to serve with baingan bharta

  • We LOVE pairing this baingan bharta with my homemade vegan naan, but it pairs well with virtually any Indian bread such as rotis and parathas. You can even pair it with store-bought flatbread or pita or even grilled bread. Or, serve it over a bed of white or brown rice.
  • Since it’s quite spicy, a nice dollop of coconut yogurt or vegan raita is the perfect pairing.
  • If you’d like to serve it as a side dish for a gourmet Indian feast, this Tofu Tikka Masala, Vegan Palak Paneer, Braised Indian Chickpea Stew, or Red Lentil Curry would all be good options.

Video Walkthrough

As mentioned, my boyfriend Max detest eggplant. But as you can see in this video, even he loves this recipe.

The only eggplant dish my boyfriend will eat
The only eggplant dish my boyfriend will eat

If you enjoy this Baingan Bharta recipe as much as he does, please be sure to rate and review the recipe below :)

Baingan Bharta

5 from 116 votes
Baingan bharta is THE eggplant dish that will make you fall in love with eggplant! It's a smoky eggplant mash mixed with a flavorful blend of garlic, ginger, spices, and tomatoes. Choose from the traditional method for the best results—smoking whole eggplants on an open flame—or the sauté method for something a little easier.
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 30 minutes
Total Time: 40 minutes
Course: Dinner, Side Dish
Cuisine: Indian
Diet Gluten Free, Vegan, Vegetarian
Serving size: 2 as a main (4 as a side)

Ingredients

Baingan

  • 1 medium-sized eggplant (about 1 pound, or 450g)
  • Grapeseed oil or avocado oil (or neutral-flavored oil of choice)

Bharta

  • 1 ½ tablespoons neutral-flavored oil of choice
  • 1 teaspoon cumin seeds
  • 1 medium red (or yellow) onion, finely diced
  • 4 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 1- inch piece ginger, grated (or minced)
  • 1 small serrano pepper, finely chopped (optional for spicy!; omit for moderate heat)*
  • ½ teaspoon ground turmeric
  • 1 teaspoon ground coriander
  • 1 ½ teaspoons kosher salt
  • 2 medium plum or roma tomatoes, finely chopped
  • ½ teaspoon kashmiri red chile powder*
  • 1 teaspoon garam masala
  • 1 cup (16g) cilantro leaves and tender stems, chopped

For serving

  • Vegan naan, roti, or other flatbread, or cooked white or brown rice

Instructions

  • Note: These first five steps are for the smoking the eggplant; check out the blog post & notes below for the alternative sauté method.*
    Ventilate your kitchen and open the windows. Grab a fan if you have one. Peel any leaves from the top of the eggplant to prevent them from burning. Brush the eggplant with a bit of oil using a pastry brush or your hands, just a light coating.
  • Turn a gas burner on your stove to medium-low heat. Use tongs to hold the eggplant upright (vertically) and hold the bottom of the eggplant over the flame for 3 to 6 minutes to char the bottom, or until a paring knife can pierce the bottom without too much resistance.
    Flip the eggplant 180º and use tongs to char the top of the eggplant for 2 to 3 minutes, but make sure the stem doesn’t directly touch the flame to avoid burning.
  • Place the eggplant onto its side (lying flat, horizontally) and rest it directly on top of the flame, positioning the fatter bottom part directly over the flame. Gently rotate the eggplant every 2 minutes.
    Once deeply charred and very wrinkly, insert a paring knife into the fattest part: if the knife slides in easily and there is minimal resistance, the bottom is done. If your eggplant was soft/ripe to begin with, it might take 8 minutes. If not, it can take 16 minutes.
    Now insert a paring knife into the skinnier top part part. If it has no resistance, the eggplant is done. If there is a bit of resistance, cook for 4 to 6 minutes, rotating every 2 minutes, until charred and wrinkly.
    Note: as the eggplant cooks, it might sizzle a bit and some juice might escape onto your stove. This is normal.
  • Turn off the heat and use tongs to transfer the eggplant to a bowl. Cover with a plate to steam for 5 minutes. Use your hands to peel off the charred papery black flakes. Dip your hands in water to make it easier to peel. It's okay if tiny little black spots remain.
  • Slice off the head of the peeled eggplant. Using a knife, flat ended spatula, or potato masher, mash the flesh of the eggplant, as if you were mincing garlic.
    Note: If your eggplant was ripe/soft to begin with, it's possible the cooked eggplant will be quite watery. If that's the case, add it to a fine mesh sieve and push down on it with a spoon to squeeze out as much excess water as you can.
  • Make the bharta. Heat the 1 1/2 TBSP oil in a medium frying pan over medium-high heat. Once hot, add cumin seeds and cook for 1 minute, tossing or swirling frequently to prevent burning. Add the onions with a pinch of salt and cook for 4 to 5 minutes, but don’t let them brown. Add the garlic, ginger, serrano peppers, and turmeric, and cook, stirring frequently for 60 to 90 seconds. Add the coriander, salt, and tomatoes, and cook until the oil starts to release from the tomatoes and the tomatoes are soft, about 5 minutes.
  • Add in the mashed eggplant mixture and red chile powder and toss well to combine. Reduce the heat to medium or medium-low and cook for 3 to 5 minutes, stirring often and mashing together. Add in the garam masala and chopped cilantro and season with ¼ teaspoon kosher salt. Serve warm with bread or rice of choice.

Notes

Sauté method for the baingan (eggplant): 
  1. Slice a peeled eggplant into ½-inch pieces. 
  2. Heat 2 1/2 TBSP oil in a large nonstick frying pan over medium-high heat. Once hot, add eggplant and ½ tsp kosher salt. Cook for 6 min, tossing occasionally, until it starts to break down. Reduce to medium and cook until soft and jam-like and there’s no resistance, about 20 minutes. 
  3. Mash the eggplant as described in the instructions above. You can use the Dhungar method for additional smokiness (instructions are in the FAQ).
Bharta Notes: *If omitting the serrano pepper but you want some heat, use more kashmiri chile powder, 1 to 1 1/2 teaspoons. 

Calories: 224kcal | Carbohydrates: 28g | Protein: 6g | Fat: 9g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 1g | Monounsaturated Fat: 9g | Sodium: 1793mg | Potassium: 1161mg | Fiber: 12g | Sugar: 13g | Vitamin A: 4751IU | Vitamin C: 37mg | Calcium: 111mg | Iron: 3mg

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182 comments on Baingan Bharta

  1. Adrienne

    5 stars
    This recipe is exotic and challenging for home cooks. Despite the elaborate instructions and video, I struggled a bit smoking my eggplant. Turning the bulb on its side and rotating every 2 minutes worked fine, but having the ends just right was more difficult. I ended up doing a hybrid preparation–sides on the stovetop and ends in a pan. It worked! The finished product was a symphony of flavor. The nicest discovery for an amateur cook like me was Serrano pepper. The soft and bold, but not overbearing heat was lovely. I will enjoy experimenting with this going forward. Thank you, Nisha!❤️

    1. Kaitlin @ Rainbow Plant Life

      Thank you for your lovely comment, Adrienne! It makes us happy to know that you enjoyed the recipe. I’m a huge fan of serrano- can’t wait for you to try it in even more applications! Some of my favorite uses for it are in this chickpea curry and these smashed potatoes. Cheers!

  2. Kornelija

    5 stars
    Even though I’ve already tried quite a few recipes from this blog, I had my doubts that my kiddo and significant other would give it a thumbs up because they’re not exactly eggplant enthusiasts. Boy, was I off the mark! Not only were they thrilled, but they even asked me to make the same lunch again! Hats off for this culinary treasure and bon appétit to everyone.

    1. Kaitlin @ Rainbow Plant Life

      Thanks for such a lovely comment, Kornelijia! It’s awesome to hear the family was finally impressed with an eggplant dish!

  3. Laura

    5 stars
    Loved this one – and it froze well!

    1. Kaitlin @ Rainbow Plant Life

      Laura, So glad to hear you loved this recipe!

  4. Tamar Gutfeld

    5 stars
    We love this recipe! We make it at least twice a month. It great to pair with lots of other things, and we eat it as either a main dish or a side with other salads. Very easy to make, and the flavor combination is incredible!

    1. Kaitlin @ Rainbow Plant Life

      Hey Tamar! Wow, I can feel your enthusiasm about this recipe through the screen! Love it!

  5. Michelle

    5 stars
    This recipe was great! So flavorful given how surprisingly easy it was to make. I don’t have a gas stove so just went the sauteed route for the eggplant and it was still tasty. I also made some garlic naan to go with it, which I highly reccommend!

    1. Kaitlin @ Rainbow Plant Life

      Hi Michelle, it’s great to hear you had success with the recipe. Thanks for the review!

  6. Mirabelle

    5 stars
    Wow! I was honestly blown away by this dish! My fiancé and I aren’t big eggplant people so I don’t think I would have ever made this if it wasn’t for the recipe club. I’m so glad I went out of my comfort zone and tried it. It’s so flavourful and delicious! It honestly felt like we had gotten take out from an Indian restaurant. It’s a very manageable recipe for a weeknight, too. We added chickpeas and served it on short grain brown rice and it made for a great meal :)

    1. Kaitlin @ Rainbow Plant Life

      We’re over the moon to hear you two enjoyed the recipe despite the reservations, Mirabelle. Thanks for your kind words!

  7. Gabrielle

    5 stars
    This recipe was really impressive. I was somewhat nervous about cooking over the burner flame but it was a fun new challenge. This dish was delicious and I’m excited to make it again with more hot peppers!

    1. Kaitlin @ Rainbow Plant Life

      Hi Gabrielle, we’re so happy you enjoyed the Baingan Bharta! :)

  8. Emily

    5 stars
    This was delicious. I love eggplant and am always looking for new ways to cook it. We didn’t grill it over an open burner, but cooked it on the grill which still gave it a slightly smokey flavor.

    1. Kaitlin @ Rainbow Plant Life

      We appreciate your feedback and support, Emily. Thank you for leaving a review!

  9. LaBreah

    4 stars
    I absolutely loved this recipe. I had never had baingan bharta before making this. The flavors were so complex from the warming spices and the heat was perfect from the serrano and the ginger. It was totally unexpected and a pleasant surprise!
    My only complaint is that it was hard for me to find the spiced needed (I live in a super rural area) so it ended up being kind of expensive since I had to order them.

    1. Kaitlin @ Rainbow Plant Life

      Hi LaBreah, thanks for taking the time to share your thoughts with us. We’re glad you enjoyed the baingan bharta, and your review is much appreciated!

  10. Patricia A Tomlin

    5 stars
    Wonderful combination of spices and ingredients that come together effortlessly. I love eggplant dishes because it is a versatile vegetable that can be transformed so many ways.

    1. Kaitlin @ Rainbow Plant Life

      Patricia, So glad to hear you loved this recipe!

  11. Aditi

    5 stars
    I was very pleasantly surprised by how much I enjoyed this dish since I usually don’t like eggplant. I’m so glad I tried it! The flavors and method of preparation make all the difference. Excellent recipe, Nisha.

    1. Kaitlin @ Rainbow Plant Life

      Awesome, Aditi. Thanks for your comment and for taking the time to review!

  12. Rachael

    5 stars
    I usually don’t like eggplant, but this was delicious! I sautéed the eggplant instead of using a gas burner or grill and it turned out great. Highly recommend serving it with some garlic naan…yum!

    1. Kaitlin @ Rainbow Plant Life

      We’re thrilled this recipe changed your mind about eggplant, Rachael! Thanks for sharing :)

  13. Amanda

    5 stars
    I doubled the recipe and did the eggplant over my grill outside. It turned out great and I am a certified eggplant hater. It was delish, the only thing is either I am very salt sensitive or doubling the recipe I shouldn’t have doubled the salt at the end because it was quite salty. But otherwise…well let’s just say I can’t say I hate eggplant anymore. Plus it was fun to play with fire to char it, etc. This dish pushed me outside my comfort zone, but then gave me a very comforting dinner. :)

    1. Kaitlin @ Rainbow Plant Life

      Thanks for sharing your experience with us, Amanda! It’s great to hear you enjoyed the process and the resulting meal. Cheers :)

  14. Christine

    5 stars
    I am a relatively new vegan who, up to now, was very frustrated trying to come up with meals I could tolerate. I am gluten-free, have diabetes, and have Gastroparesis. I was about to give up on eating all together ! Foods best for Gastroparesis tend to raise my blood sugar.

    Then I found a video on YouTube featuring Nisha and I was hooked! I have learned how to use a bouquet garni, to layer my seasonings and aromas, and every recipe I’ve tried has come out so great!

    Thank you, Nisha, because I have become quite a fan of yours! I love eggplant and my two favorite ways to eat it were parmigiana and in a Spanish stew with small chunks of pork! As a new vegan, neither way is an option for me. This recipe made me a lover of eggplant once more. Thank you, Nisha!

    1. Kaitlin @ Rainbow Plant Life

      We’re so happy that the baingan bharta turned out well for you, Christine. It’s so awesome to hear the RPL recipes have helped change your outlook and ways of eating. We are rooting for you!

      Thanks for taking the time to leave a comment and for trying out the recipe :)

  15. Sunya

    5 stars
    I made this and wow – so amazing! I added smashed chickpeas to mine, and ended up sauteeing the eggplant in oil and water (not charring it on the flame). It was still so good that way. Definitely making this again. Next time I will serve it with some rice. This time I served it with pasta actually, and it was so still so good!

    1. Kaitlin @ Rainbow Plant Life

      Hi Sunya, so jazzed to hear you loved the recipe! So interesting to hear it was delicious even with pasta, thanks for sharing!

  16. Maria

    5 stars
    I made this and forgot to take a picture! Served it over brown rice and it was so tasty!

    1. Kaitlin @ Rainbow Plant Life

      Thank you for your lovely comment, Maria! It makes us happy to know that you enjoyed the recipe.

  17. Amanda

    5 stars
    We loved this recipe! My husband doesn’t normally like eggplant but he wants me to make this again! Thanks for another wonderful recipe. I think next time I’ll try making my garlic and ginger into a paste like I normally would for Indian dishes to see if it brings out even more flavor.

    1. Kaitlin @ Rainbow Plant Life

      We’re so happy that the baingan bharta turned out well for you two, Amanda. Thank you for taking the time to leave a comment and for trying out the recipe!

  18. Melinda

    5 stars
    As an eggplant lover, I was eager to try this, and I’m glad I did! Because I don’t have a gas stove, I used the sautee method; the detailed instructions and notes on how to do this were much appreciated. The final product is delicious: super flavorful, and it’s juuuust spicy enough from the serrano pepper so that you enjoy the heat but it doesn’t distract you from enjoying the other tastes. I paired it with brown rice and chickpeas for four day’s worth of meal-prep lunches and am enjoying my lunch breaks extra this week.

  19. Jessica Dugas

    5 stars
    Really enjoyed this recipe! Ours did not come out the darker red color as I believe our fresh tomatoes were a little lighter in color and we did the stove top method with the eggplant, however, it certainly didn’t deter from the flavor! This recipe was enjoyed by our whole family from ages 7-48.

  20. Angela

    5 stars
    My friends loved this dish! I used the saute method and it was still so flavorful.

    1. Kaitlin @ Rainbow Plant Life

      Hi Angela, it’s great to hear you had success with the recipe. Thanks for the review!

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